French protests a rejection of Sarkozy’s politics of blame

The mass mobilisation is not just a fight against tough pension reforms.

The massive strikes in France mark the failure of the Sarkozy government. Weeks of unrest, culminating in mass opposition to the raising of the pension age, show a public deeply unhappy with their government and the direction it has taken the country.

Three years ago, a few days before the presidential elections that catapulted Nicolas Sarkozy into the presidency, the hyperactive candidate promised the French he would break away from the legacy of the student uprising of May 1968…

He promised that France would again stand tall, that he would put the French back into jobs and revive the morals and values whose lack had caused a deep ”identity crisis”.

With an unabashed populist rhetoric, neo-liberal Sarkozy even promised to put an end to savage capitalism, the appearance of which he blamed on the students’ and workers’ revolt.

Continue reading French protests a rejection of Sarkozy’s politics of blame

A Travesty of Democracy

As the 2010 Federal election loomed, May 31 saw a debate at La Trobe University regarding what had gone wrong (or ‘right’) with the Rudd government. Respected and influential journalists Paul Kelly and Lenore Taylor and professors Judith Brett and Robert Manne offered an extremely critical account of the performance of the Rudd government over recent months. As has become common in the media, the verdict was unanimous and commentators, despite their different political sensibilities, agreed on the Labor government’s loss of credibility. From extreme popularity after his 2007 victory against Howard, Rudd had reached a point of complete distrust. Criticism during the discussion was centred on Rudd’s inability to stand up for anything real or keep even the most emblematic promises made before and after his election. The failure of the insulation scheme and of the educational revolution, the withdrawal of the Emission Trading Scheme, the failure to prepare adequately for the tax on mineral resources, the return to extremely inhumane politics in terms of refugees and many more back flips were raised in the discussion. Despite some interesting points, very little debate followed as it seemed clear to all that the government could no longer be trusted: it had gone back on most of what it had promoted and promised, sometimes in a matter of mere weeks.

Continue reading A Travesty of Democracy

If The Truth Hurts, Campaigning is Painless

May 31 saw a debate at La Trobe University regarding what had gone wrong (or ‘right’) with the Rudd government. Respected and influential journalists Paul Kelly and Lenore Taylor and professors Judith Brett and Robert Manne offered an extremely critical account of the performance of the Rudd government over recent months. As has become common in the media, the verdict was unanimous and commentators, despite their different political sensibilities, agreed on the Labor government’s loss of credibility. From extreme popularity after his 2007 victory against Howard, Rudd had reached a point of complete distrust.

Criticism during the discussion was centred on what we have all witnessed: Rudd’s inability to stand up for anything real or keep even the most emblematic promises made before and after his election. The failure of the insulation scheme and of the educational revolution, the withdrawal of the Emission Trading Scheme, the failure to prepare adequately for the tax on mineral resources, the return to extremely inhumane politics in terms of refugees and many more back flips were raised in the discussion. Despite some interesting points, very little debate followed as it seemed clear to all that the government could no longer be trusted: it had gone back on most of what it had promoted and promised, sometimes in a matter of mere weeks.

Continue reading If The Truth Hurts, Campaigning is Painless

Knowledge for its own sake

Knowledge for its own sake seems to have lost its currency in a world where “outcomes” have become the goal of tertiary education.

But education without a necessary career goal should be valued, which is why on May 1, the Melbourne Free University, co-founded by Jasmine-Kim Westendorf, Gerhard Hoffstaedter and myself, was inaugurated after a year of planning.

Although the attendance was not yet enough to call it a ground-breaking experiment, the discussions had were illuminating and convinced us we were on the right track. Common beliefs have brought us together to try to offer an alternative to an increasingly “outcome-oriented” form of education.

The concept is not radical. Many Free Universities have sprung up around the world in the past few years such as the Université Populaire of Lyon, which was somewhat of a model for us. It is able to rely on more than 30 teachers and offers topics as unexpected as astrophysics.

Continue reading Knowledge for its own sake

Reflections on Anzac Day

Julia Gillard told Australians this week that they should not be scared to say “what they feel”. Howardesque, she told them not to be put off by censorship and political correctness. Saluted by Pauline Hanson, she said that the “people” who are “anxious about border security” are “expressing a genuine view”. In short, Gillard promised to be the voice of the people; the voice of those who feel for the children in detention and those who do not. The voice of those who are aware that a few thousand asylum seekers will not endanger Australia, and those who are encouraged by our politicians to think we should turn “leaky boats” back to sea.

Is this really what the “people” think? Are “the people” genuinely concerned by the arrival of boats, or are they made to be concerned by the very politicians seeking their votes? Should politicians be allowed to wage scaremongering campaigns based on simplistic exaggeration in order to become elected as representative of the Australian “people”? This is where the crux of the matter lies and this is where Australia will have to choose between becoming a more “genuine” democracy and falling into a reactionary populism that we have already witnessed under the Howard government.

Continue reading Reflections on Anzac Day

The ‘Devil’ in Haiti

A few days after the earthquake, Pat Robertson, a sexist, racist, homophobic American preacher, declared Haitians themselves were to blame for the disaster as they had sworn ‘a pact to [sic] the Devil’. Sometimes it is hard not to believe that the ‘Devil’ has played a role in Haiti’s plight. However, no pact was ever sworn. If hell was unleashed on Haiti on 12 January, colonialism and neo-colonialism had a great deal to do with it. Hell has been Haitians’ path to freedom ever since its desire for emancipation was first quashed over two centuries ago.

Any country would have suffered from such a terrible earthquake. Even in Australia people would have died; however, it is unlikely that the death toll would have been anywhere near that of 12 January. Many journalists have implied that Haiti had failed to rise up to the challenge of modernity as, for example, their Dominican neighbours had. This argument tends to make us feel better as it reinforces a common underlying racism as to the impossibility of ‘blacks’ ever being able to free themselves from poverty and civil war.

Continue reading The ‘Devil’ in Haiti

Our Haitian Hypocrisy

In January, in the wake of the Haitian earthquake, The Age published a piece by Chris Berg, from the Right-wing think-tank Institute of Public Affairs. Berg argued that the only thing Haitians need now is to ‘get away from Haiti’. For Berg, Haiti is a lost cause, and intrinsically unable to develop.

To prove his point, Berg cited the amount of aid wasted on Haiti and quoted the World Bank on the impossibility of making any progress due to the endemic political instability. The only solution is for Haitians to come and work (read: be exploited) in Western countries, learn our civilised ways and send money back home.

Of course, Berg is somewhat of a caricature. Most journalists did not express such narrow views. There were also notable exceptions, those who gave an informed picture of Haiti and its tragic history. Yet under the veneer of progressivism, many journalists and commentators reiterated the arguments Berg had put forth. Haiti was a failure, a doomed country that had been unable to lift itself out of poverty and perpetual political crisis. Continue reading Our Haitian Hypocrisy

On the fluctuating value of lives

First published in Arena Magazine – December 2009

Recent events have taken me back to almost a year ago. Time flies, suffering and indifference remains. What I found confirmed through these events and their reception in Australia is that we need to acknowledge equality ever more urgently.

Within two weeks last year, over 750 Palestinians lost their lives in what became known as the war on Gaza. Thousands more were wounded. While some were admittedly soldiers from Hamas, many, if not most, were civilians. A third were children. On 6 January 2009, The Australian reported that in an online poll on their website 53 per cent believed the invasion to be justified. Even if The Australian’s readers do not adequately represent the Australian population as a whole, this led me to wonder why so many people, in a country which has in fact no direct link to the conflict, could decide to support such an invasion. What argument could justify the death of hundreds and the further starvation and impoverishment of thousands? Can the deaths of a few Israeli justify such a massacre? It is a strange reminiscence of colonial times, when the slaughter of many more colonised was adequate punishment for the murder of a coloniser. Continue reading On the fluctuating value of lives

On politics, exclusion and rhetoric